Villanueva MG et al. [1] compared 8 weeks of strength training with 60 seconds or 4-minutes breaks between sets. A group of 60 seconds breaks between sets: men were on average 65.6 ± 3.4 years old. A group of 4-minutes breaks between sets: men were on average between 70.3 and 4.9 years old. All men 4 weeks were trained in a standard program (3 x a week), only later they were divided into groups and continued the exercise for 8 weeks. The only difference between the programs was in the break between the series.

Results

All participants:

they increased lean body mass,
increased the strength of the upper and lower body,
they increased their power,
they reduced the amount of body fat.

In men from the group of 60 seconds breaks between series, there were:

greater increase in lean body mass,
greater strength increase in bench press,
greater force gains in leg extrusion (gantry),
greater increase of force in retrieving the pull rod with a narrow neutral grip,
greater power increase in the staircase test.

Before you run to the gym I have major doubts about the above research. Young people will react completely differently to training, and quite differently those that are trained. This is confirmed by the observations of Schoenfeld BJ [2]. 21 strength-trained men (aged 18-35) were randomly assigned to the group of “short rest” (1 minute break between sets) or “long rest” (3 minutes). Within 8 weeks, men performed the same resistance training program, containing 3 series of 8-12 repetitions, 7 different strength exercises.


Results in terms of hypertrophy

the increment (examined by measurement of the transverse muscle section) in the group of 3 minutes intervals for elbow flexors (eg bicepod maneus) was 5.4%, change in the group of 1 minute breaks was 2.8% (there was a trend that these data were statistically significant) .
the increase in the group of 3 minutes breaks for the m three-headed arm (triceps) was 7.0%, for the group of 1 minute breaks between the series barely 0.5% (statistically insignificant),
the increase in the quadriceps thigh in the group of 3-minutes breaks between the series was 13.3%, while in the group of 1-minute breaks between the series of 6.9%,
there were no differences between the groups in the increase in the thickness of the m. vast lateralis.

Results in terms of muscle strength and strength

strength in the squat in the group of 3-minutes breaks between sets increased by 15.2%,
strength in the squat in the group of 1 minute breaks between sets increased by 7.6%,
strength in bench press, lying in the group of 3 minutes breaks between sets, increased by 12.7%,
strength in bench press, lying in the group of 1 minute breaks between sets, increased by 4.1%,
Muscle endurance in bench press (the weight of 50% of maximum, the number of repetitions) increased by 23.2% in the group of 3-minutes breaks between sets,
Muscle endurance in barbell bench press increased by 13% in the group of 1 minute breaks between sets.

The Schoenfeld BJ [2] study appeals to me more because it was conducted on training and younger people. Often, observations about older or untrained people are misleading. Probably for hypertrophy, there are better longer rest breaks (120-150 seconds between sets) than those of 45-60 seconds. For strength building, even 3-4-minutes breaks between series are beneficial (ATP reconstruction).

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